Relationship Planning

Setting your relationship up for success


Falling in love is the most amazing feeling. When you are ready to take that next step, whether moving in or getting married, actively working with your spouse on future plans should be part of your process. We are here to help. Our skilled family law attorneys can provide guidance as you navigate the laws that could impact you and your relationship. Planning for your future is the ultimate expression of care. After all, what could be more romantic than talking about your future plans and then setting that plan together?

BEFORE YOU SAY ‘I DO’

Prenuptial Agreements


You’re engaged! Congratulations. This is such
 an exciting time in your life. Working through a prenuptial agreement together can lay the foundation for open and honest communication during your marriage. Through the formation of the agreement, you will be discussing your financial situation and plans for the future. Did you know that couples with prenuptial agreements are actually less likely to get a divorce than those without them?


Our team of attorneys in King, Pierce, and Snohomish counties are ready to discuss your options and determine whether a prenup is the right choice for you. They are available to draft or review as needed to help ensure the document meets the fairness standards set by Washington courts.

PRENUPTIAL FACTS

Things to
Know Before

 

ADDRESSING YOUR CONCERNS

Postnuptial Agreement

 

Postnuptial agreements have become increasingly common in recent years. There are many reasons why couples may want to consider a postnuptial agreement. Having level-headed discussions about what to do if circumstances change in your relationship can be a great way to build stability and trust in a marriage. A postnuptial agreement can help you and your partner determine what you would want to happen to your children, how you would like your assets divided, and the terms of any spousal maintenance in case of a future divorce.

 

Allow one of our diligent matrimonial and family law attorneys, specifically trained and skilled in drafting marital agreements, to explain what terms to include in your postnuptial contract. A post-marital contract for you and your spouse prepared by one of our firm’s postnuptial agreements lawyers can successfully address all your concerns and protect your rights.

UNMARRIED COUPLES

Cohabitation Agreements


If you decide to live with your partner but not marry, you may want to consider creating a contract to define the financial and other property aspects of your relationship. Without an agreement, and assuming your relationship meets court-defined standards of a committed intimate relationship, the court will equitably distribute assets and debts considered community property acquired during the relationship.

To more clearly determine how assets will be distributed and used upon separation or one partner’s death, couples often choose to enter into a contract, known as a “Cohabitation Agreement” or “Living Together Agreement,” defining their rights and desired outcome. Our Washington-based family law attorneys can write a contract for you and your partner to ensure you are both protected.

UNMARRIED COUPLES

Cohabitation Agreements


If you decide to live with your partner but not marry, you may want to consider creating a contract to define the financial and other property aspects of your relationship. Without an agreement, and assuming your relationship meets court-defined standards of a committed intimate relationship, the court will equitably distribute assets and debts considered community property acquired during the relationship.

To more clearly determine how assets will be distributed and used upon separation or one partner’s death, couples often choose to enter into a contract, known as a “Cohabitation Agreement” or “Living Together Agreement,” defining their rights and desired outcome. Our Washington-based family law attorneys can write a contract for you and your partner to ensure you are both protected.

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ANOTHER OPTION

Domestic Partnerships


Domestic partnerships in Washington State are far less common now that same-sex marriage is federally recognized. Nonetheless, registering as domestic partners affords couples the legal rights and responsibilities of married couples under state law. Registered domestic partners are NOT afforded the same rights and responsibilities as married couples under federal law.

You do not need an attorney to apply for a domestic partnership. But you may want to consider our experienced team of estate planning and family law attorneys who can help protect your assets and preserve your wishes.

IN WASHINGTON STATE

You can register for a domestic partnership only if:


  • You or your partner is at least 62 years old
  • The other partner is at least 18 years old
  • You are both legally capable of consenting to the domestic partnership
  • Neither of you is already married or in a domestic partnership
  • You are not too closely related by blood
  • You are living together

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