Tips for Divorce

If people do get divorced, it will most likely be their first and only time going through it. One of the tasks of a good family law professional is to guide their client through the process. Understanding what options are available is important. Perhaps something like mediation would work better. Good family law professionals also steer their clients toward outside resources they can use to understand their feelings and make good decisions during this tough time.

An author of an upcoming book on how to handle going through the divorce has offered several tips on what to do to make your separation as amiable as possible:


1. Learn before you burn. Know your legal options. Know who can help you outside of the legal world too (e.g. psychologists)

2. Manage your expectations. Consult with a lawyer to understand the legal precedents for divorce in your state.

3. Plan ahead, and plan as if your spouse is planning ahead.

4. Stay clear with your attorney. Neither you nor your attorney should hide any facts about the case or the relationship, even if they are embarrassing. Be honest.

5. Mind your money. Take stock of your personal finances. Understand your attorney’s fees.

6. Don’t focus on now, focus on five years from now. This will make your decisions more rational.

7. Take the high road. The judge isn’t going to be swayed by emotion. Don’t say anything that can be used against you, including on social media.

8. Start with mediation, but don’t let a mediator push you into an immediate settlement. Run it by a lawyer.

For more information on these tips, read the full article at the Huffington Post. For more information about how we can help you with your family law questions, call Elise Buie Family Law Group, PLLC. We serve the state of Washington.

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